Solar water heating systems and rainy Cape Winters

Solar water heating systems and rainy Cape Winters

If you have had a solar water heating system installed in an area with rainy/cloudy winter months, you may need to make seasonal adjustments to the timer that controls the system's electrical backup.   Now that the Western Cape has started experiencing its typical Winter rainfall again, this has meant less hours of sunshine for solar water heating systems to achieve the desired water temperature.  Those of you who have installed a solar water heating system in recent months have probably been enjoying solar heated water every day without much need for electrical backup.  You may need to adjust  the backup settings now that winter is here.   Most solar water heating systems have an electrical backup that is controlled by a timer to switch on at certain times of the day if the solar water heating system has not achieved the desired temperature.  Typically the timer would be set to switch on twice a day, once in the morning and once in the afternoon/evening,...
Read More
17 Clever ways you can save water in your kitchen right now

17 Clever ways you can save water in your kitchen right now

Even as water restrictions in the Western Cape are fast receding in our collective memory, we should remain mindful that South Africa is a water scarce country and we are ALL responsible for using water with care. It is important to save water in your own home but also important to be mindful of the bigger picture. For example, showering at the gym reduces your household’s water consumption, but doesn’t reduce the total water usage from the dams, which is where we need to see the bottom line!   Here are a few handy tips for saving water in your kitchen:   The first (and second) step 1. Make sure that everyone in your house knows about the new restrictions and understands the rules of the house, this applies to children, domestic workers, garden staff, workmen and visitors to your house. 2. Be mindful of how you live, most water saving tips are simply common sense.   Cleaning and washing 3. If you are running off water to get to the...
Read More
Cape Town draws battle lines over right to buy alternative energy from IPPs

Cape Town draws battle lines over right to buy alternative energy from IPPs

The City of Cape Town has been awarded an opportunity to make its case on why it is beneficial for the province to cut out the middle man (Eskom) and purchase electricity directly from independent power producers (IPPs).   The City, led by its mayor, Dan Plato, will get a chance to engage Eskom and the National Energy Regulator of South Africa (Nersa) in court about this on 18 June.   Why does the City of Cape Town want power from IPPs? IPPs are privately-held corporations with facilities to generate power. IPPs own 1 000MW of power generated from gas turbines, all of which is exclusively available to Eskom for procurement.   If approved, the City will be able to purchase up to 400MW of electricity from IPPs as surety in instances where load shedding is implemented.   Plato encourages other provinces to join the fight For Plato, the ball lies in Eskom’s and Nersa’s court on what they deem is more important between profit and the catering needs of...
Read More
Charcoal black colour coded solar water heating systems now available

Charcoal black colour coded solar water heating systems now available

Aquasolar now offers the popular Chromagen range of solar water heating systems in Charcoal Black. The new charcoal black range of solar water heating systems blends in well with most darker roof tiles and other roofing materials like tin and asbestos.  This is an attractive alternative for home owners who prefer a more discreet look, as well as housing estates that prescribe that solar systems should be finished in black. Aquasolar's Chromagen range of solar water heating systems consists of a solar geyser and either one or two solar panels, depending on the size of the system.  Both the solar tank and the panels are made out of chromadek, powder-coated to either a Graphite Grey or Charcoal Black finish. The colour of the solar water heating system is purely an aesthetic choice.  There is no difference in efficiency between the grey and the black solar water heating systems.  Please check whether your preferred choice of colour is available when placing your order, so...
Read More
Aquasolar PE exhibts at the Algoa FM Homemakers Expo 2010

Aquasolar PE exhibts at the Algoa FM Homemakers Expo 2010

Aquasolar PE recently completed a very successful exhibition at the 2010 Algoa FM Homemakers Expo.  We would like to thank all our customers for supporting us at this event. The Algo FM HOMEMAKERS Expo took place from 30 September - 2 October at the all new lifestyle venue Moffett on Main. The brand new location was a definate hit with both visitors and exhibitors alike and this was one of Port Elizabeths best expos yet. Members of the Aquasolar management team from Head Office in Cape Town came in especially to lend a hand during the long Expo hours.  An all-round team effort!...
Read More
Aquasolar 10 year warranty available on Chromagen systems

Aquasolar 10 year warranty available on Chromagen systems

Aquasolar is pleased to announce the availability of a warranty extension plan on the Chromagen range of solar water heating systems.  The standard 5 year warranty can now be extended to 10 years for a nominal fee. Chromagen, established in 1962, is a world leader in the field of solar water heating systems.  Chromagen systems are available in more than 35 countries and are renowned for innovation, quality and cost saving.  It is on the basis of this superior product line that Chromagen has made a 10 year warranty available in South Africa. Aquasolar, in co-operation with Chromagen, is offering the warranty extension plan to all customers who install a Chromagen indirect solar water heating system in South Africa.  The warranty extension plan can be purchased at the time of installation for a fee of R1500 ex VAT and applies to the solar panels and the solar geyser. And there is good news for existing Aquasolar customers. You too can also take advantage of...
Read More
Claiming your Eskom rebate – it’s easy, we do it for you

Claiming your Eskom rebate – it’s easy, we do it for you

The first thing a lot of clients ask us is how to claim their Eskom rebate.  We always tell them not to worry because we do the claim for them.  And we have never had a rebate claim rejected, ever.   But many people still want to know how the process works.  So we have prepared a crash course on the Eskom Rebate system and what to expect every step of the way.       What is the rebate?   The rebate is essentially an incentive or subsidy, which you can claim from Eskom after you install a solar water heating system that qualifies on Eskom's solar water heating rebate programme.   What is a ceded rebate?   A ceded rebate is an Eskom rebate that is paid to you upfront, instead of after the fact.  From time to time, Aquasolar offers special deals and promotions whereby the Eskom rebate is paid to you at the time of installation.  In this case there is no need for you to claim the...
Read More

New rebate on Aquasolar 200L solar system

Aquasolar is pleased to announce that the Eskom rebate on our 200L Chromagen flat panel solar system has recently been revised to R5,340.  The new Eskom rebate is available to all customers who have installed a 200L Chromagen solar water heating system by Aquasolar on or after the date that the rebate was revised. The new Eskom rebate means that our 200L flat panel solar system is subsidised by nearly 30% of its value, fully installed.  The 200L solar system is a great choice for average sized families and households of up to four people.  If you are not sure what size solar system you require for your home, we will gladly advise you.  Generally speaking, if you currently have a 150L electric geyser, you should consider switching over to a 200L solar geyser. The 200L solar system retails for approximately R19,300 including installation.  With the new Eskom rebate of R5,340 the effective cost of investment on this solar water heating system...
Read More
South Africa; land of coal and CO2?

South Africa; land of coal and CO2?

Why we're still burning coal and why you should be concerned about it. Firstly, South Africa with it's 90% reliance on coal for electricity generation, is right up there with the main culprits contributing to the production of greenhouse gasses; on a per-capita basis that is.  Burning of fossil fuels is the main source of CO2 production and thus global warming. Clearly then, we have to apply our minds to alternative sources of energy. That's easier said than done because not only is such green energy largely inefficient and not practical on a large scale (yet) but it is also very expensive.  For example, coal-based electricity is generated at approximately 44c/unit (kWh). Wind power costs about R1,50/unit to produce. Eskom's new Medupi  Power Station will have an installed capacity of 4800 MW (megawatts). By way of comparison, Koeberg Nuclear Power Station generates 1800 MW and the Lesotho Highlands Hydropower Scheme delivers 1000 MW. A wind turbine like the one visible at Coega outside...
Read More
New energy-efficiency hub on cards for SA

New energy-efficiency hub on cards for SA

A Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) was signed on Wednesday opening the way for the establishment of the so-called South African Regional Energy Efficiency Centre (SAREEC), which is expected to begin operations within 24 months. Once developed, the centre will offer research and information, as well as energy-efficiency product validation for builders, designers, architects, utilities, governments and manufacturers. The MoU was concluded between the South African National Energy Research Institute (Saneri), the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) and the Association of Architectural Aluminium Manufacturers of South Africa (Aaamsa). The purpose of the agreement was to facilitate the establishment of a centre for testing of the energy efficiency performance of building-envelope components, as well as to provide a Southern African hub for research and development. Its creation would be funded through various local and foreign entities. The centre would house a testing laboratory, as well as training facilities and would be developed within the existing infrastructure of the CSIR, incorporating expertise from the built...
Read More